Tag Archives: Game On Math

The Psychologist’s Role in Teaching Mathematics

Historically, psychologists have studied math but have been noticeably absent when it comes to doing direct mathematics work with children.   Notable exceptions include Diennes, Bruner, and Vygotsky, but to this day Psychologists tend to assess and make recommendations for treatment.  This surprises me, given the cognitive processing involved and the anxiety that so often appears in achieving and struggling math students.  I have designed and delivered treatment programs for struggling mathematics students for nearly 15 years, and I believe that other Psychologists could really contribute.  Psychologists have a unique and relevant skill set that would add value to a treatment team.  I have used mathematics as a vehicle in promoting a variety of therapeutic outcomes.    The hours I spent working on math may be my most favored memories of my practice.   To learn math for many of these youngsters is to conquer fear.  I offer a few thoughts on the role of psychologists in teaching math.

Psychologists can:

1) Discover the structure of the child’s thought through constructing mathematical models and problems.  Given space, children can do more than simply apply the sometimes confusing rules that might work on tests only to later fail to appear when encountering real world problems.  Psychologists aim to enhance thinking performance which leads to confidence and resiliency.

2) Psychologists might help make sure that math enjoyment survives past 2nd grade.

3) Psychologists get training in helping children use the imagination.  These techniques are well suited to mentally manipulate mathematical relationships, calculation problems and decoding symbols as mental objects.  Psychologists teach visualization, for instance, which goes far in enhancing performance by using visuospatial skills.

4) Help children understanding  concepts,  meanings, and numbers. Math is a language developed for measuring and describing the natural world.  Symbols appear, in part, to prove  underlying ideas, relationships, and concepts.  Physical objects are the reality, the symbols allow us to manipulate it.  (There are exceptions in higher math, of course).

5) Help children use discovery to make math meaningful. Rote Memorization=boredom.  When we play and build math problems, the inherent creative strategies transfer to real life problem solving.

6) Psychologists can make math fun. What if Math were fun? What if Math became an aesthetic experience?  I often repeat “fun is solving a problem mentally” which is how   Raph Koster defines it in his book A Theory of Fun).

7) We feel better by doing better.  The Psychologist might help  through a combination of play, motivational psychology, mindfulness, assessment, talk, and other interactive skills.  The psychologist trades in  building resiliency and helping patients solve problems.

Chime in and let me know what you think.  Have I made a case for it?

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Filed under Bullying, Dr. Marty, education, educational gaming, Game On Learning, Game On Math, learning, literacy, Math, mathematics, parenting, Primal Math, Psychology

Coping With Math Anxiety Can Be About Perspective

Many children experience discomfort around math, we generally call this Math Anxiety, a fear that math is going to be uncomfortable and full of failure.

Here’s an interesting post via Elizabeth Stevens on Math Anxiety, I wished to share with you all.  Math performance is so important today.  Math is actually fun.  But, we have to approach it in an engaging way.  We can do this and we are doing it.  Thanks to colleagues like Elizabeth.

Let’s remember:

1. Math aptitude is not inborn, math skills can be learned.

2. Math is super creative, there are many different ways to get an answer.

3. Boys and girls can both be great at math, it depends on what we tell children about their experiences with math.

If you wish to delve deeper check out Thinking Mathematically: Integrating Arithmetic and Algebra in Elementary School by Thomas Carpenter, et al.

Breathe… and enjoy Dr. Marty

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5 Year Old Discovering Equivalent Fractions

This is the Doo Dah playing math.  Fractions. This is where kids often learn to hate math.  Guess what?  We can change it.  I’ll describe what is happening in this short video.  The Doo Dah is a) seeing what a fraction is b) playing w/ the proper toys/tools to help her discover its meaning c) going from concrete (seeing/touching, etc.) to abstraction (writing symbols, abandoning the manipulatives and doing the math in her head).  I hope you enjoy the short video.  I mainly want you to see how much fun we have doing math.  Math is a puzzle.  Math is a game. But, it is very hard to learn anything if you are not curious/interested in what you are doing.  So, let’s make it a game and play!

Anxiety is first the anticipation of an upcoming event. From that, there is an irrational fear that the outcome will be terrible, horrible, awful, etc.  Math Anxiety is the irrational fear that math is “too hard” and that “I’m going to fail” and “I’ll never get it b/c I’m not smart enough”,  etc.  Nonsense.  Just watch the Doo Dah.  Have fun and Game On.  Also, if you like the blog, please subscribe.  I blog on parenting and education issues mostly.  Thanks, Dr. Marty

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5 Year Old Doo Dah Likes #Algebra

The Doo Dah and I “play math” before she goes to Kindergarten.  We keep it fun, but do some pretty abstract things.  You can really see her thinking as she factors a polynomial.

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